Spooky Halloween Treats Your Kids Will Love

Spooky Treats

We want to share with you some of our favorite fall foods and spooky Halloween treats that you can make with your kids. These are recipes that we made with our kids, and now we enjoy doing with our grandkids. These make for a fun time with your family, and you may even entice picky eaters to enjoy some fruits and veggies.

Ghosts & Pumpkins

First, we have some healthy snacks: Ghosts and Pumpkins.  The ghosts are really bananas cut in half, and the eyes are mini chocolate chips pressed into the bananas. The pumpkins are clementine oranges. How easy is that? And it looks really fun.

Jack O’Lantern Stuffed Peppers

Our next spooky treat is Jack O’Lantern Stuffed Peppers. Use your favorite stuffed pepper recipe. But use orange, or maybe red or yellow peppers instead of green peppers. Before you bake the peppers, cut out jack o’lantern eyes, mouths and noses out of the peppers.  Then bake and stuff the peppers according to you favorite recipe.  If some of the filling spills out of the eye or mouth holes, it just looks spookier. The cutting of the peppers should be done by an adult, but kids can help with the rest of the recipe. Our kids were always more eager to eat veggies and food in general if they got to help make it.

Spider Cookies

Of course, we can’t leave out dessert. These spider cookies are so easy and fun to make, and of course to eat. Use your favorite creme-filled sandwich cookie for the body of the spider. Use some frosting to glue on the eyes. The eyes could be any colored round candy or even candy corn. The legs could be red or black licorice. You could also use pretzel sticks or shoestring potatoes for the legs. These are also called potato sticks, but they taste like potato chips. We used chocolate sandwich cookies with both white and red frosting in the middle. You could also use vanilla sandwich cookies to make brown spiders. Just use your imagination or what you have around your kitchen.

 
 
 
HAPPY FALL FEASTING!

Credits:

Cast

Dr. McVey as Himself

Becky McVey as Herself

Writer

Becky McVey

Director/Editor

Anna McVey-Tyson

Spooky Halloween Treats Your Kids Will Love

We want to share with you some of our favorite fall foods and spooky Halloween treats that you can make with your kids.

Meet the Staff: Kelli

For the sixth installment of the “Meet the Staff” series, we interview our dental hygienist, Kelli.

Ask the Expert: when is the best time to get orthodontic treatment?

A short guest “Ask the Expert” article addressing braces and timing brought to you by your friendly neighborhood orthodontist! Dr. Doi from High Plains Orthodontics explains the basics of when it’s the right time to pursue orthodontic treatment for your child and, possibly, yourself.

Hours

  • Mon: 8 AM-5 PM
  • Tues: 8 AM-5 PM
  • Wed: 8 AM-5 PM
  • Thurs: 8 AM-5 PM
  • Fri: By appointment only

Contact Us

(620) 275-9157

2501 Campus Dr #100, GARDEN CITY, KS, 67846

 

@2018 Randall K. McVey, DMD PA.
All Right reserved.

Meet the Staff: Kelli

Get to Know Staff Member Kelli

You probably best know Kelli by the work she does on your teeth during your regular dental checkups. For the sixth installment of the “Meet the Staff” series, we interview our dental hygienist, Kelli. We ask her a few questions about her job at Randall K. McVey, DMD PA and about things she does outside of work. 

How long have you been working in dentistry?

I’ve been a hygienist for 10 years.

What inspired you to pursue your career?

When I was little, my favorite book was Teeth. I loved it so much that I knew if I scribbled in it, my Mom would have to buy it from the library. I still own that book today. When I was a freshman in High School, Colby Community College started their dental hygiene program. There was no doubt in my mind that that’s what I wanted to do.

What is your favorite part about your job?

I love that my patients and co-workers have become like family to me.

What are some of your hobbies?

I enjoy running, shopping and spending time with my son Westyn.

How would you describe your fashion sense?

I would like to think I have a great fashion sense, but honestly, it’s best described as scrubs and mom life!
 

Thanks…

 

Thanks for reading and getting to know Kelli a little a bit better. We all look forward to seeing you in the office again. Until next time, here’s to your health!

Spooky Halloween Treats Your Kids Will Love

We want to share with you some of our favorite fall foods and spooky Halloween treats that you can make with your kids.

Meet the Staff: Kelli

For the sixth installment of the “Meet the Staff” series, we interview our dental hygienist, Kelli.

Ask the Expert: when is the best time to get orthodontic treatment?

A short guest “Ask the Expert” article addressing braces and timing brought to you by your friendly neighborhood orthodontist! Dr. Doi from High Plains Orthodontics explains the basics of when it’s the right time to pursue orthodontic treatment for your child and, possibly, yourself.

Hours

  • Mon: 8 AM-5 PM
  • Tues: 8 AM-5 PM
  • Wed: 8 AM-5 PM
  • Thurs: 8 AM-5 PM
  • Fri: By appointment only

Contact Us

(620) 275-9157

2501 Campus Dr #100, GARDEN CITY, KS, 67846

 

@2018 Randall K. McVey, DMD PA.
All Right reserved.

Ask the Expert: when is the best time to get orthodontic treatment?

Ask the Expert: when is the best time to get orthodontic treatment?

Getting braces (aka orthodontic treatment)

A short guest “Ask the Expert” article addressing braces and timing brought to you by your friendly neighborhood orthodontist! Dr. Doi from High Plains Orthodontics explains the basics of when it’s the right time to pursue orthodontic treatment for your child and, possibly, yourself.

 

When is the best time to get my child braces?

Parents often ask when the ideal time is to bring their child in for an orthodontic examination. Officially, the American Association of Orthodontists recommends age 7. This is when most children have some permanent incisors in (or erupting) and the 6-year molars (first permanent molars for those of you who prefer proper dental nomenclature). At this age, the jaws are still developing and can be modified, if needed.
Ideally, orthodontics would not begin until all the permanent teeth are in but there are some situations that should be addressed when there is a mixture of adult and baby teeth. After an initial consultation, the orthodontist will determine if any orthodontic treatment is indicated or if just monitoring until all the permanent teeth are in is the way to go.

How about orthodontic treatment for everyone else?

Well, how about everyone else? Orthodontics isn’t just for people who are still growing. Anytime you have a question about your smile, bite, alignment of your teeth (spacing, crowding, etc.), any jaw related issues, can be evaluated by an orthodontist. Teeth move at any age. So it doesn’t hurt to get braces as an adult either.

In conclusion…

So, when you start seeing those permanent teeth coming in, ask Dr. McVey if it’s time to make an appointment to see the orthodontist. If you have any questions, Dr. McVey can guide you. Until next time, keep smiling, flossing, and brushing!

 

Spooky Halloween Treats Your Kids Will Love

We want to share with you some of our favorite fall foods and spooky Halloween treats that you can make with your kids.

Meet the Staff: Kelli

For the sixth installment of the “Meet the Staff” series, we interview our dental hygienist, Kelli.

Ask the Expert: when is the best time to get orthodontic treatment?

A short guest “Ask the Expert” article addressing braces and timing brought to you by your friendly neighborhood orthodontist! Dr. Doi from High Plains Orthodontics explains the basics of when it’s the right time to pursue orthodontic treatment for your child and, possibly, yourself.

Hours

  • Mon: 8 AM-5 PM
  • Tues: 8 AM-5 PM
  • Wed: 8 AM-5 PM
  • Thurs: 8 AM-5 PM
  • Fri: By appointment only

Contact Us

(620) 275-9157

2501 Campus Dr #100, GARDEN CITY, KS, 67846

 

@2018 Randall K. McVey, DMD PA.
All Right reserved.

Let’s discuss the mercury in amalgams (aka fillings)

Let’s discuss the mercury in amalgams (aka fillings)

Today there are more choices for restorative materials than at any time in the past. Dental amalgam, also known as silver fillings, is one choice for teeth in the back of the mouth that has been in use for around 150 years. Amalgam is a metal alloy that contains silver, tin, copper, and mercury. Amalgam lasts a long time and is less expensive than other materials such as tooth-colored composites, porcelain, or gold.

Amalgam is durable, is not as sensitive to moisture as many other materials, and can be placed in less time than other materials. This makes it a good choice for children and people with special needs who may have difficulty staying open or still during treatment.
Amalgam does have some drawbacks. Amalgam fillings are not natural looking, and this may be a significant issue if the tooth being restored is in an area that shows when speaking/smiling. Another disadvantage is that an amalgam may require the removal of more tooth structure than a tooth-colored composite, for example.

Is amalgam safe?

 

Silver fillings have been used successfully for around 150 years, but you may wonder about the mercury content in this filling material. When mercury combines with the other metals it forms a stable and safe “amalgam” material.  There is more than one form of mercury. There is methylmercury, elemental mercury, and inorganic mercury. Methylmercury, or organic mercury, is the form of mercury that can accumulate in water sources and be absorbed by the fish we eat. If you ever eat canned tuna, you have been exposed to methylmercury. Methylmercury has been linked to various systemic effects. Dental amalgam does not contain methylmercury, but rather elemental mercury.  Methylmercury is absorbed through the digestive tract while elemental mercury is absorbed through the lungs from vapor created while chewing. This vapor, while it does exist, is measured in parts per billion, so exposure is very small.

The safety of dental amalgam has been studied by various credible scientific groups. The American Dental Association, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. U.S. Food and Drug Administration and World Health Organization all state that based on extensive scientific evidence, dental amalgam is a safe and effective cavity-filling material. The Alzheimer’s Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, Autism Society of American and Nation Multiple Sclerosis Society—all science-based organizations—also say that amalgam poses no health risk. The Mayo Clinic also recently stated that dental amalgam is a safe and durable choice for dental fillings.
Some people, of course, may be sensitive to some of the ingredients in dental amalgam—mercury, silver, copper, and tin. If there is a sensitivity to these materials, then another material should be chosen for restorations.

Current use

Over the course of my career amalgam has been used less and less as other more esthetic materials become available and the demand for more natural appearing restorations increases. Based on the available scientific evidence so far, my opinion is that there is still a place for dental amalgam where finances and patient management are more important than esthetic concerns.

In Conclusion

Your safety and your health are our primary concerns. That is the reason we exist as a practice. If you have concerns, we would be glad to discuss those. If you would like to do some research on your own, I would suggest beginning with the ADA article found at www.mouthhealthy.org and type “amalgam” in the search box. This gives a good overview and has some great links to other science-based organizations.
Dr. McVey’s top 10 reasons to floss your teeth

Dr. McVey’s top 10 reasons to floss your teeth

Flossing.

What does that word bring to mind? Perhaps, it seems like an unnecessary step in your daily routine. Maybe you can’t go a day without flossing. Whatever you think of, there are many good reasons to floss. Some of those reasons may seem obvious and others may seem surprising. So…without further delay…

Here is the countdown of the 10 Reasons to floss:

10. Flossing may reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease. Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease and inflammation is a key player in cardiovascular disease. So reducing inflammation in your gums can reduce your cardiovascular risk.
9. Flossing may reduce the risk of female-specific health issues. Women experience fluctuating hormone levels throughout life. These hormone fluctuations impact the bacteria that grow in the mouth. Hormone-related gum disease seems to increase the risk of low birth weight, pre-term labor, osteoporosis and even fetal death. Though we don’t know at this time if there is a direct cause-and-effect relationship between these health issues and periodontal disease, there is definitely a strong correlation. 
8. Flossing may reduce complications associated with arthritis. Again, both arthritis and periodontal disease are inflammatory processes and controlling inflammation in one area can help the entire body.
7. Flossing may help prevent weight gain. Obesity and periodontal disease share inflammation in common. There appears to be a link between periodontal disease and metabolic syndrome, a condition marked by a cluster of conditions including high blood pressure, high blood sugar, obesity around the abdomen, and high cholesterol. It stands to reason that controlling inflammation could be helpful in the battle of the bulge.
6. Flossing can reduce your risk and complications associated with diabetes. Diabetics are more prone to inflammation-related problems and, as we’ve already discussed, flossing reduces inflammation of the gums. Maintaining good oral hygiene has been shown to have a positive impact on glycemic control in Type 2 diabetics.
5. Flossing can help you stay well. Respiratory ailments such as pneumonia and bronchitis are caused by bacterial and viral infections of the lungs. Researchers have found that the bacteria that grow in the mouth can invade the respiratory tract and make symptoms of bronchitis and pneumonia worse. Other studies have shown that elderly patients with good oral hygiene suffer much less frequently from pneumonia. 
4. Flossing can prevent periodontal disease. 
3. Flossing can prevent cavities that develop in between the teeth. 
2. Flossing can help control bad breath. The bacteria that grow between your teeth and below the gumline produce waste that can be very stinky, to say the least. 
1. And, finally, the number one reason to floss…So you won’t have to feel guilty about not flossing when your hygienist asks how often you floss!
Wheel of cheese cut and stacked in front of a stone wall

Photo by Alexander Maasch on Unsplash

Final Thoughts

I didn’t even mention that having floss available makes a handy cheese or cake slicer (try it, you’ll like it).

All in all, some pretty great reasons to floss. Remember: You don’t have to floss all your teeth, only the ones you want to keep.